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Animal Control

Dog and Cat Breeds

While breeds don't necessarily make the dog or cat, they can tell us a lot about what to expect in appearance, behavior and other characteristics.  It's important to do a little research before you adopt a new pet into your family.

Research Dog Breeds

Research Cat Breeds

Caring for Your Pet

Vaccinations and Licenses

These are a must-have to keep your pet healthy and in compliance with Sedgwick County code.

Watch the Weather

Animals often are more resilient to changing weather, but extreme weather affects them as much as it affects their owners.

When temperatures rise:

  • Bring your pets inside – if it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your pets, especially pets with thick fur.  Just imagine wearing a fur coat during the summer – uncomfortable and dangerous!

  • Provide plenty of fresh water – if you wouldn’t drink it, your pets shouldn’t either.

  • Make sure your pets have access to a shaded area and limit their time spent outdoors.

When temperatures fall:

  • Bring your pets inside – even animals with thick coats can freeze in cold weather.  If your pet is shivering, it’s too cold for him/her.

  • A dog house should be insulated, adequate bedding provided, and the opening should face south to avoid the cold northern winds blowing inside.

  • Make sure your pet’s water isn’t frozen.

Fences, Houses and Chains

Animals need room to roam and a safe place to sleep.  Do your fences, houses and chains meet these guidelines?

Fences

  • Dogs must remain on leashes or in fenced yards when outdoors.

  • Dogs should not be able to jump over fences or squeeze through openings.

Houses

  • Insulated houses, especially in the winter, are important for your dog.

  • Splinters, jagged edges, exposed nails and holes should be repaired.

  • Bedding should be washed regularly and kept dry.

  • Place the house in a shaded area in the summer and point the opening so the wind does not blow in (usually south) in the winter.

Chains

  • Only use chains, ropes or other materials to "tie up" your pet temporarily and when you are nearby. Do not tie up your dog (or any pet) as a permanent means of detainment.

  • Allow 10 or more feet in chain or rope to let your dog move around easily.

  • Make sure the chain or rope is an appropriate size – if it’s too heavy, it can harm your pet.

  • Make sure your dog can’t get caught on a fence, deck or other obstruction that might cause harm.

  • Make sure your dog can reach shade, water and protection from the weather.

Get more tips about caring for pets, including food, exercise, grooming, pet supplies and training.