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Corrections

Key Initiatives

2012-2013

  • To reduce recidivism and promote public safety, each program shall track and analyze program outcomes by assessed risk levels to benchmark successful completion rates using approved evidence-based strategies geared to increase client success.

  • To assertively seek funding and programmatic opportunities at all levels to enable our clients to succeed in being more productive citizens. The current economy with high unemployment, government changes and budget challenges at all levels is reducing funding for offender programs and services. We shall demonstrate leadership and provide policy-makers with accurate information and recommendations that promote public safety and long-term fiscal responsibility.

  • To continue to participate fully in the planning, implementation, operation and/or monitoring of any county-approved programs from the Criminal Justice Alternatives Master Plan to reduce demand for adult detention services.

  • To maintain and promote respectful and inclusive workplaces the department shall continue using the established M.E.E.T. model to help recognize, respond to, and resolve day-to-day workplace situations. Cultural competence of staff and the organization will be a priority by planning and field testing a Diversity Phase V training program in 2012 for delivery to all DOC staff in 2013.

  • To improve student success of youth involved with the juvenile justice system at both the policy and individual case levels by providing an education liaison position housed at the juvenile court offices.

  • To maintain summer schools provided by the school district at our juvenile detention, residential and boy’s ranch facilities to enable students to earn credits and improve their academic skills while in placement.

  • To plan and implement a consolidated department-wide staff training program.

  • To participate with the Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority in the Annie E. Casey Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) by working collaboratively with community and justice system stakeholders to collect and analyze data and make agreed upon improvements. The work will also involve collaborating with consultants from the Annie E. Casey JDAI and representatives from four other Kansas sites (Shawnee, Johnson, Douglas and Wyandotte counties). The JDAI work is voluntary and anticipated to last five years (until 2016).

  • To continue to plan and facilitate cross-systems policies and practices to improve coordination and integration of service delivery inside our community to youth and families with complex needs.

2011 Progress On Key Initiatives

  • To reduce recidivism and promote public safety, each program shall track and analyze program outcomes by assessed risk levels to benchmark successful completion rates using approved evidence-based strategies geared to increase client success.

    • Progress: The changes have been planned and reporting will begin in 2012.

  • To assertively seek funding and programmatic opportunities at all levels to enable our clients to succeed in being more productive citizens. The current economy with high unemployment, government changes and budget challenges at all levels is reducing funding for offender programs and services. We shall demonstrate leadership and provide policy-makers with accurate information and recommendations that promote public safety and long-term fiscal responsibility.

    • Progress: Ongoing. State and County governments are engaged in organizational planning and downsizing in response to the political and financial climates. The department downsized the Community Corrections Adult Residential Center from a capacity of 120 to 65-beds due to a county decision to reduce funding. To further reduce county expenditures we provided recommendations that were adopted to change the target population for the facility and eliminate use of a waiting list. The changes reduced jail population by 50 per day. The impact on the state corrections system and our clients has been loss of capacity for “last chance” sentencing options for probation and increase in admissions to state prisons.

  • To complete work with the MacArthur Foundation Models for Change, DMC Action Network, and state and local partners to study, design and implement strategies to reduce the overrepresentation of minority youth entering and moving more deeply into the juvenile justice system.

    • Progress: Completed with Sedgwick County being recognized at the national level for our work. This work mobilized justice, community and school system stakeholders to study and address Disproportionate Minority Contact at the points of arrest and detention for probation violators to prevent youth from moving deeper into the system. The jurisdiction improved data collections, expanded detention alternatives, developed MOUs with the Wichita Public Schools and police to provide an Alternative to Arrest procedure, established systems of graduated response in probation and implemented cultural competence training for corrections department personnel. The model we utilized provides a pathway for other jurisdictions to approach DMC reduction and achieve significant cost savings by reducing arrests, use of secure detention and out-of-home placements. Details may be reviewed on the department website.

  • To continue to participate fully in the planning, implementation, operation and/or monitoring of any county-approved programs from the Criminal Justice Alternatives Master Plan to reduce demand for adult detention services.

    • Progress: Ongoing. Data analysis, planning and programming produced reductions in the jail population. The department downsized the adult residential center and the day reporting program to respond to changing conditions. An evaluation study of the Drug Court program was requested and completed. Wichita State University completed an update study of the Criminal Justice Comprehensive Master Plan for Sedgwick County. This work continues to be a high priority for the County.

  • To maintain and promote respectful and inclusive workplaces, all staff will complete phase IV diversity training and continue using the established M.E.E.T. model to help recognize, respond to, and resolve day-to-day workplace situations.

    • Progress: Completed. Fifteen one-day classes were provided to train 352 staff members.

  • To improve student success of youth involved with the juvenile justice system at both the policy and individual case levels by establishing an education liaison position housed at the juvenile court offices.

    • Progress: Ongoing. The position was established and two successful MOUs were developed and implemented with police and school administration to reduce arrests for minor offenses at Wichita Public Schools. This work was presented and recognized at the national level as system improvements that could be replicated. On a parallel track, planning was completed for a transition school and it opened in October serving youth placed at the juvenile residential facility. The change provides more comprehensive educational services for youth residing in this alternative detention facility.

  • To re-establish summer schools provided by the school district at our juvenile detention, residential and boy’s ranch facilities to enable students to earn credits and improve their academic skills while in placement.

    • Progress: Completed and Ongoing. The agreement with USD 259 restored six-week summer school programming for youth in these facilities.

  • To complete an Innovation and Advancement Project by organizing community teams including youth using Six Sigma processes to tackle four difficult systemic issues in juvenile justice. Ideas generated through these processes will be presented to policy and management leaders.

    • Progress: Completed. The work products will serve as a guide in making system improvements as opportunities become available.